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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
We are very pleased to be on here, and we hope to be able to give advice and understanding on everything to do with 3D Printing. We are car enthusiasts, and are currently working with F1 teams to produce parts for wind tunnel and on-car applications.
We'd like to use the knowledge of materials and applications and allow GTR members to take advantage of these technologies.

There are over 200 different materials for 3D Printing currently available, from rubbers, all the way through to Titanium metal. (We only run a few materials but will be happy to give advice on any of them).
The beauty of these technologies is that you have much more design freedom than traditional manufacturing, although there are still some design considerations.

FAQ
Q. What on-car applications can we use 3D Printing for?
A. We’d like to hear suggestions and ideas from the GTR community, but as a starting point: Custom cooling ducts, gauge pods, covers, brackets and battery clamps. We are planning to run a competition looking for the best ideas shortly.

Q. When would you suggest using 3D Printing?
A. Bespoke items would be best. If a part is already available to purchase from Nissan or an aftermarket company, then that will usually be the cheapest option. A better use is if a part isn’t available to buy, or you need to modify an existing design to suit your requirements. Typically production runs of 1-20 parts is most cost effective compared with other manufacturing methods.

Q. What material would be best to produce parts for my car?
A. It depends on the application. There are dozens of different technologies commonly available, but I'd say the most likely candidate would be a Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) material. Parts are tough and have a temperature resistance up to 170'C.

Q. What is the largest part that can be built?
A. Machines can vary in build envelope size from 100mm up to 4m in size, but depends on technology.

Q. What is the cost to produce a part?
A. Cost from most suppliers is usually based on the size and volume of a component, but not complexity. This means a small complicated part (such as a prototype CAT5 network connector) is very cost effective to produce a 1-off compared with other manufacturing methods. A bespoke part of this size may cost around £10 and be produced in 1-2 days. But large simple parts (e.g. car bumper) that can be made in traditional methods, would work out very expensive at around £20,000.

Q. What is needed to produce a part?
A. A 3D file in STL format. If you have access to 3D CAD, you should be able to export an STL file. If you don’t use CAD, you can give a sketch or a drawing of the part you’d like to make (or the original part to be modified), in order for your supplier to convert onto CAD, and there would be an additional cost for the CAD work.

 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Hello people,
anyone have any questions on the technology or ideas for applications on GTR's?
Kevin
 
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