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Discussion Starter #1
I'll be the first to admit I'm a bit sh1t on the brakes at the track, I have a habit of boiling the fluid. The only thing that seems to put up to a certain degree with my nana braking is the Castrol SRF.......Only thing is it is as dear as poison!

Is there anything else that people have found that has the wet boiling temp of SRF? I tried the Motul 600, and it just didn't cut it.
 

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Find a good racing fluid that within you budget, play with the pad compounds instead.

You guys down under/kiwis love to fabricate stuff, another option would be to take you pads to a good fabricator order a sheet of 1mm titanium and get some heat spacer shims cut out. Try to isolate as much heat from transferring to the fluid ....granted not cheap, but well...becauseracecar? :D
 

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Find a good racing fluid that within you budget, play with the pad compounds instead.

You guys down under/kiwis love to fabricate stuff, another option would be to take you pads to a good fabricator order a sheet of 1mm titanium and get some heat spacer shims cut out. Try to isolate as much heat from transferring to the fluid ....granted not cheap, but well...becauseracecar? :D
Depending on the exact alloy stainless steel can be as good as Ti wrt thermal conductivity. Interestingly the factory setup comes with a stainless shim in the "stack".

Also the pad is a great insulator so replacing pads once they are half worn will help alot, rather than running them down to the min thickness. Also the more metal (cheaper sintered track pads) in the pad the more they conduct the heat to the fluid.

Sub boy you are doing good cool down laps - ie not touching the brakes at all? Brakes shed heat quickly with air flowing over them (convection) but if you stop while they are still hot they just transfer their heat to the caliper hub and wheel (conduction).
 

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Hi have the motul stuff in mine only had 2 track days on it last year but had no fade and pedal felt consistent, have upgraded to APs this year so should be even better :)
 

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Fair enough, but depending on thickness of material it matters.

Would love to know the s.s alloy that can match up with Ti with regards to conductivity? (Being serious, no asshattery intended at all!)
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Edit

Also, I'd hazard a guess and say most sport cars come with a stainless shim, but from my reading about the eom ones that I remember, this is mostly a NVH reason, as a slip plate between the pad and piston on a pillow of brake lube vs conductivity.

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Pads still get my vote, I'm still driving the r35 around on Oem brembos on carbotech pads and motul 660 with cool downs I've yet to fade them, must be driving like a granny tho lol seeing how many people go to alcons :eek:





Depending on the exact alloy stainless steel can be as good as Ti wrt thermal conductivity. Interestingly the factory setup comes with a stainless shim in the "stack".

Also the pad is a great insulator so replacing pads once they are half worn will help alot, rather than running them down to the min thickness. Also the more metal (cheaper sintered track pads) in the pad the more they conduct the heat to the fluid.

Sub boy you are doing good cool down laps - ie not touching the brakes at all? Brakes shed heat quickly with air flowing over them (convection) but if you stop while they are still hot they just transfer their heat to the caliper hub and wheel (conduction).
 

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Fair enough, but depending on thickness of material it matters.

Would love to know the s.s alloy that can match up with Ti with regards to conductivity? (Being serious, no asshattery intended at all!)
--------
Edit

Also, I'd hazard a guess and say most sport cars come with a stainless shim, but from my reading about the eom ones that I remember, this is mostly a NVH reason, as a slip plate between the pad and piston on a pillow of brake lube vs conductivity.

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Pads still get my vote, I'm still driving the r35 around on Oem brembos on carbotech pads and motul 660 with cool downs I've yet to fade them, must be driving like a granny tho lol seeing how many people go to alcons :eek:
There are lots of engineering resources out there giving thermal conductivity for different materials. You see figures in w/m degC between 11-19 for both stainless (in a variety of alloys) and Ti. Most steel is around 40, aluminium is around 200 to put that in context.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Cheers guys, I will look into the Motul 660 and some brake shims.
I'm running some pretty good pads (Project MU Club Racer), I haven't had brake fade, just long pedal. I don't really want to run a heavier pad than that if I can avoid it, it will start to eat through rotors, and I will have to change them to use them on the road.

In fairness I'm prob not allowing them to cool down before I come back in, So I should look at doing that a bit more.
Again, I know its my driving that is the problem with the brakes, there is a corner at my local track that is a dogleg after the front straight, and you approach it at 230kph.....And I'm such a sook that I ride the brakes through there :(
 

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Castrol SRF
Motul RBF 660
Gulf Competition RF 1000

They are all very good racing brake fluids. Regarding price from expensive to cheap it's Castrol, Motul, Gulf. Motul and Gulf have higher dry boiling points then the Castrol. However Castrol has the highest wet boiling point by far. So if it's that what you're looking for, there probably is no way round the Castrol.

Actually there is the Endless Racing RF650. This one is very good too. It's what the Mercedes GP team uses in Formula 1 so certainly can take some heat. However it is expensive too. And I don't know its boiling points, you will have to check. Dry one is defo gonna be over 300 C though.

In the end you really need to think about your braking style. And maybe add some cooling. I know what I'm talking about as I am very hard to the brakes too and kept killing systems like crazy. You need to brake hard before the corner, then turn in, apex, accelerate etc. It is not a good idea to brake gently or with medium force for an extended time keeping your foot on the pedal as you will overheat the whole system.
 

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Hit the pedal hard, that initial braking must be hard then your bleeding off the pressure either before turn in or if trail braking into the apex. Riding the brakes on off all over the place will cause a lot of heat.
 
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