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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering if anyone had any experience or valuable intel about ceramic coating the hotside turbo manifold.

In basic work production of the turbo, the greater temperature difference between the in and out of the exhaust of the turbo the great work is produced.

So by ceramic coating the exhaust manifold and turbo manifold, you keep the temperatures inside the system, which then allows the more work produce.

From looking around, I heard it can increase spool time up to 500 to 750 rpm sooner compared to without. But I also heard about durability issues.

Any info, especially personal experience would be helpful.

Thanks.
 

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I was thinking about doing this aswell so I'm interested in what others have to say too ;)

Although I read somewhere that when wrapping or coating the exhaust manifolds they become more prone to cracking...:runaway:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
coating the exhaust manifolds they become more prone to cracking...:runaway:
That's what I have under durability. To my understanding, ceramic is durable. But it's like glass, if you take it from a oven to cold water it shatters. I imagine rate of temperature change is the source of it's cracking. But it be nice to have people have first hand testimonials of it lasting a long time/ or not.

Also another plus I forgot to mention is that it lowers overall bonnet temperatures, since the heat is contained.
 

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Performance gains will be unmeasurable. Underbonnet heat will be reduced. Visually it looks good. Choose black, pale colours stain and discolour quickly. Choose a good product applied by professionals. It won't be cheap. I would only bother in a GT or single seater race car environment where body panels are invariably close to the engine for aerodynamic reasons. The coating will help stop radiated heat.

I wouldn't coat a tubular manifold unless it was Inconel, stainless manifolds with no turbo or wastegate supports are on a wing and a prayer without keeping more heat within them.
 

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Performance gains will be unmeasurable. Underbonnet heat will be reduced. Visually it looks good. Choose black, pale colours stain and discolour quickly. Choose a good product applied by professionals. It won't be cheap. I would only bother in a GT or single seater race car environment where body panels are invariably close to the engine for aerodynamic reasons. The coating will help stop radiated heat.

I wouldn't coat a tubular manifold unless it was Inconel, stainless manifolds with no turbo or wastegate supports are on a wing and a prayer without keeping more heat within them.
what about cast manifolds?

I planned on going down to Zircotec next week, but l am 50/50 at the moment.

Want to do the turbo ex housing and the mani.

Is there any truth in the 'better spool up time' ?
 

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My engine RB26 runs ported stock manifolds. Without being arrogant I could have afforded a tubular manifold from one of the big names, but my experience, with hard used track cars, is that stock cast manifolds are often King. I would rather loose BHP than have the hassle of buying / modifying tubular manifolds, and a custom made *PROPER* manifold would take my project well over budget. I was happy with twin bigger turbos though. Ceramic coating will help reduce under-bonnet heat, but I defy anyone to produce real world figures for better spool time. If these coatings, good as they undoubtedly are, helped overall efficiency, they'd be on every mass produced turbo production car. Just in my humble opinion, I am not savvy to manufacturers databases.
 

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If these coatings, good as they undoubtedly are, helped overall efficiency, they'd be on every mass produced turbo production car.
It costs money, so probably not.
 

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My understanding is that the stock cast manifold is best for 99% of uses.. and that wrapping them can cause them to warp and possibly crack...

Ceramic coating sounds fragile and possbly expensive... I think a nice alternative would be to make a steel housing for the manifold, hot side of the turbo and first part of the downpipe (A bit like the one manufacturers fit) but make it a closer fit and surround the turbo better.
 

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Zircotec coating is pretty costly, it looks nice and does make big difference to the amount of radiated heat. I guess it depends on your budget and how keen you are to reduce underbonnet heat, or how close stuff is to the turbine housing(s) and manifold(s). But if it ain't broke..... :)
 

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My manifold,and twin td 06 turbos are at Zircotec at the mo,i was fed up of the messy looking exhaust wrap.

If i get any performance gain it will be a bonus.
 

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The car in question is running 650bhp and is mainly used on road.

What, the cast manifolds are also prone to cracking even for road use?

Or is it because of the ceramic coating keeping more heat in that is shorting the life of a cast manifold, it just can't be avoided?

noz.


My understanding is that the stock cast manifold is best for 99% of uses.. and that wrapping them can cause them to warp and possibly crack...

Ceramic coating sounds fragile and possbly expensive... I think a nice alternative would be to make a steel housing for the manifold, hot side of the turbo and first part of the downpipe (A bit like the one manufacturers fit) but make it a closer fit and surround the turbo better.
 

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The car in question is running 650bhp and is mainly used on road.

What, the cast manifolds are also prone to cracking even for road use?

Or is it because of the ceramic coating keeping more heat in that is shorting the life of a cast manifold, it just can't be avoided?

noz.
From what I can make out the problem with wrapping them is more to do with them warping, Possibly resulting in broken studs and rendering the manifold scrap... And at 650hp its going to be rather hotter than stock allready I imagine. Thats why I suggesrted using steel shields that are a snug fit but not tight up tot he pipes ect, should keep the under bonnet temp down and lower the risk of high temp buildup.

A friend who uses a 6L racing V8 uses tubular manifolds that are sleeve fitted and then wrapped, this seems to get round any problems as the pipes can all move against each other. Doubt that idea would be suitable for road use though.
 
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