GTR Forum banner

1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well I bought a Fluidampr from Summit Racing in the states for $390.00 delivered, Part number 610911- Do luck wants 102,000 JPY for the same thing???? Any way its been installed and well the car justs slips through the RPMS nicely. The engine idles smoother and seems to pull harder, redline seems to come a bit quicker. Could this be placebo due to something having been added to the engine, or is the butt dyno telling the truth about registering a positive gain from the addition?? I have read good and bad things about the fluidampr on the net, with the same breathe ATI has had alot good and bad things written about it also, both brands seem to be good, I would guess it comes down to personnal preference. Is there anybody else running a fluidampr? The science behind Fluidampr seems sound, opinions?

Fluidampr® How it Works Page.

http://www.fluidampr.com/DOWNLOADS/Fluidampr_Flyer.pdf

Fluidampr® Damper Facts.

NISSAN DAMPERS BY FLUIDAMPR
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,171 Posts
Not quite sure about these generically tuned dampers myself

If they were the panacea for harmonic damping at all frequencies wouldn't engine makers jump at a one size fits all damper with just a crank nose hub change to worry about?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Production runs have to remain with in a set budget so, will it get by with a $10 easily made piece of iron and rubber or do we splurge and get the $400.00 dollar Hypo piece. A base product is put out for sale, with a limited performance capability, step in aftermarket companies to help the owner raise the level of their cars performance by develping products specific for their rides and needs. Its all about Kaching.

So no opinions on Harmonic Balancers? I just wanted to get more of a feel for whats going on, since alot of the focus is on uprated Turbos and rods pistons ETC. ETC. There are very few threads on the topic of harmonic balancers and its importance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
ironically i have been reading this only yesterday as im looking at my damper setup, i would have got the ati but ive just bought the greddy pulleys and i dont really want to change again, which leaves me with the super street ati and the fluidampr, but im not sure which to go for as both seem priced the same but you have to have a shorter belt with the ati, im not sure about the fluidampr as ive heard a couple of bad reports but im also not sure if its a direct replacment i.e use all the same belts and pulleys and if you can run aircon with it (i discounted ross due to this) i will be running around 600hp and want to use the whole rev range to about 8000rpm

i have also seen the ati is only rated to 500hp but people seem to suggest thats its easily capable of more
 

·
Skyline Section Manager
Joined
·
11,878 Posts
One aftermarket device, the Fluidampr™, is an example of a damper. It dissipates energy by transforming it into heat by shearing action in a high viscosity fluid. Some race car people seem to like it, but it is banned from the top levels of NASCAR racing, reportedly because with extended use at high levels of energy dissipation, the polymers in the shearing fluid become rearranged and the fluid then settles off-center when the engine is stopped. Next time it is run, the nose of the crank is horribly out of balance, and there's a short run from there to cranksaft failure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
so for a 600hp gtr will it be ok? the last thing i want to do is put it on and ruin an otherwise good crank

also asphalt jet is it lighter than the oem pulley? and what power levels are you running etc
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I believe it is lighter than the stock damper, I'm not sure I didn't weigh them, I am not running big power, I'm not tuned yet either, still amassing parts. However I ran one on my 440 Dodge Challenger back in the states and it was putting down 550 to 600 depending on what carburator was on it, but it was a 10 second car all day. The thing is your not gonna go out and put down 500 miles in 2 1/2 hours and never come down past 120 miles an hour on a circuit, like NASCAR. There are pros and cons to everything, this damper doesn't need to be rebuilt every 2 years or so, like is recommended for the ATI. You will notice a difference right off the bat, the car will slip through the revs smoother, responce will be better. It's a matter of choice, we build em like race cars but do we really run them like race cars, ther may be the trackday we go to a couple two three or four times a year, but mainly we are on the street. On the track your not all out all day either, I am happy with the choice. Read as much about it as you can digest the knowledge and then determine where you are at and what the limits of your build will be. I am looking to be around 500 at the wheels, and I will be good as it is my daily driver.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
my friend has an R33 fluidampr on his 900+ HP Tomei 2.7L/T8834GK RB with no issues. He revs 10500rpm. According to fluidampr, there is no real HP limit to their dampers, just an RPM limit of 12K.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,329 Posts
One aftermarket device, the Fluidampr™, is an example of a damper. It dissipates energy by transforming it into heat by shearing action in a high viscosity fluid. Some race car people seem to like it, but it is banned from the top levels of NASCAR racing, reportedly because with extended use at high levels of energy dissipation, the polymers in the shearing fluid become rearranged and the fluid then settles off-center when the engine is stopped. Next time it is run, the nose of the crank is horribly out of balance, and there's a short run from there to cranksaft failure.
i was kind of thinking the same thing, when using a fluid type damper on the end of a crank you are basically creating your own centrifuge :confused:. in fact if i were looking to separate molecules of differing densities, this is how i would do it:D

i personally like the idea of a rubber type damper and change it every 2 years or whatever. a good point was made though, it really should depend on the application in hand.

kev
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
623 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
NISSAN DAMPERS BY FLUIDAMPR

http://www.fluidampr.com/DOWNLOADS/Fluidampr_Flyer.pdf

Fluidampr® Damper Facts.

Fluidampr® How it Works Page.


If you change the mass of pistons, rods, or the crankshaft, you change the natural frequency of the crankshaft assembly; therefore, the stock damper is no longer tuned to the new frequency of vibration. How do you determine the new frequency range if one of the above has been changed? Will the ATI be in that range?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,222 Posts
The worlds quickest full street trim GTR runs fine on an ATI damper. But then again, it was built and tuned properly in the first place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,150 Posts
it seems like there are pros and cons of both the fluidampr seems to be very good but may have issues at super high performance race levels where no one here will really go whereas the ati is ok there, but most peoples ati dampers are not tuned right on their car due to modifications so will not be as good as fluidampr i would go with fluidampr but i cannot find anywhere that sells it online that delivers to the uk so i will prob go with the ati!!
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Top