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Reading the article it looks like filling the tank so there's zero oxygen would work better!
I've gone for the tank almost empty approach.
 

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I don't think the oxygen reffered to is in the space in the tank Gort, it's in the fuel itself, so filling the tank would make no difference.

I'm surprised they say it can lose 1 ron per day, but they also say it's a logarithmic degradation, so rather like the effect of CO2 on temperature, the first 50 ppm has a greater effect than the following 200 ppm, hence just one of the reasons why there will never be man made global warming, but let's not go there :)

The other interesting thing is that the calorific value of ordinary unleaded is greater than that of super unleaded, I knew that after studying fuel years ago, but most ppl would never believe it's so. :)
 

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I don't think the oxygen reffered to is in the space in the tank Gort, it's in the fuel itself, so filling the tank would make no difference.

I'm surprised they say it can lose 1 ron per day, but they also say it's a logarithmic degradation, so rather like the effect of CO2 on temperature, the first 50 ppm has a greater effect than the following 200 ppm, hence just one of the reasons why there will never be man made global warming, but let's not go there :)

The other interesting thing is that the calorific value of ordinary unleaded is greater than that of super unleaded, I knew that after studying fuel years ago, but most ppl would never believe it's so. :)
I read it that it's the air in the station tank, but as the petrol doesn't know where it is it will behave the same in the car's tank.
So if the area exposed to the air is just the width of the filler then there shouldn't be a major issue vs. the volume in a full tank, so maybe I should have gone for the full tank approach???
Too late now as I'm 6,000 miles away.
 

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Odd amount if concern here.

Leave it nearly empty. If necessary drop the map to 95, drive off boost straight to the station in spring and brim it with the good stuff.

I've not read the article.
 

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I read it that it's the air in the station tank, but as the petrol doesn't know where it is it will behave the same in the car's tank.
So if the area exposed to the air is just the width of the filler then there shouldn't be a major issue vs. the volume in a full tank, so maybe I should have gone for the full tank approach???
Too late now as I'm 6,000 miles away.
I think you've read it wrong mate. Air in the tank makes no difference.
 

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Better to leave the tank full, it stops condensation and rust forming in the tank. Always done this and added a fuel stabilizer, never had any problems, even on a highly tuned NA engine with very high compression ratio.
 

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Leave tank nearly empty
Fill jerry can up in March
Put jerry can in car

Surely that's the most simple and safe way?
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Better to leave the tank full, it stops condensation and rust forming in the tank. Always done this and added a fuel stabilizer, never had any problems, even on a highly tuned NA engine with very high compression ratio.
Condensation and rust were my next questions. Just read up on fuel stabilizers on Wikipedia. Seems like the way to go considering the tank is very nearly full anyway.
 

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I'm shocked there are people out there putting their cars away for the winter and worrying about modern fuels deteriorating inside the tank. These are modern day cars designed for everyday use in all conditions are they not? I'm bewildered to see people treating them like rare antique ferraris that may rust at the first sight of salt
 

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I'm shocked there are people out there putting their cars away for the winter and worrying about modern fuels deteriorating inside the tank. These are modern day cars designed for everyday use in all conditions are they not? I'm bewildered to see people treating them like rare antique ferraris that may rust at the first sight of salt
It's all about choice, to be honest. I used to do the same with mine, mainly because I found no enjoyment in driving it in poor weather conditions and I had a nail as a daily driver. I think most people who put them away for winter are in the same, or similar, position to how I was.
 

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I'd be more concerned about the problems caused from leaving an engine sat doing nothing for long periods of time and the damage caused by the first few seconds of running than the petrol losing a bit of fizz.
 

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I'm shocked there are people out there putting their cars away for the winter and worrying about modern fuels deteriorating inside the tank. These are modern day cars designed for everyday use in all conditions are they not? I'm bewildered to see people treating them like rare antique ferraris that may rust at the first sight of salt
I'm on holiday in Asia for 3 months due to swmbo's health so have no choice.
 

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I think you've read it wrong mate. Air in the tank makes no difference.
OK, you're probably correct but another example of poor sentence construction (by the journo) leading to hard to comprehend information.
 

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It's just a couple of months and it's only gasoline... top off your fuel tank and avoid driving like a maniac later when you are going to use up the tank of fuel.
Nothing is going to happen, besides IF you happened to loose a couple of octane ratings and you feel that you really have a lead foot, well that's why you have knock sensors.
 
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