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https://www.motor1.com/news/346758/r36-nissan-gtr-hybrid/

R36 Nissan GT-R Probably Won't Be A Hybrid

Development costs, customer desires, and the longevity of the current R35 platform are likely to push a hybrid powertrain back several more years.

Despite a corporate push by Nissan to fit hybrid and battery-electric powertrains across its lineup, the next-gen Nissan GT-R almost certainly won't use them. As the GT-R's chief product specialist sees it, executives and customers don't want to make this supercar more expensive than it is now.

With the R36 model green-lit for production, Nissan is still undecided if it should invest in a brand-new chassis that could accommodate a gas-electric powertrain or update the existing R35 platform – no slouch after more than a decade on sale in the U.S. – and reskin the body. At the moment, according to GT-R legend Hiroshi Tamura, the latter is most likely.

"Do you really, really want a hybrid for the GT-R? Ninety-nine percent of our customers say, 'No, thanks,'" Tamura told Motor1.com at the New York Auto Show.

Adopting new technology that could amplify the GT-R's prodigious power and torque-vectoring performance isn't the biggest concern. It's cost. The 2019 GT-R starts at $101,685 for the Pure and finishes at $177,235 for a Nismo. Adding a gasoline-electric hybrid setup like the Acura NSX, Tamura said, could push the GT-R past $200,000 – and for Nissan, that's looking like a no-no.

"Mr. Customer, you have a choice," he said. "You cannot have both."

The next GT-R will be faster and stickier than before, because "you have to give the customer more." But the R36 can either stay within its current price range or approach the Lamborghini Huracan's window sticker. The Italdesign-built GT-R50, a 50-car run selling for more than $1 million apiece, is an experiment of how much the most loyal GT-R customers will pay. It's not indicative of a no-limit, anything-goes hypercar for the next generation.

Tamura estimates a hybrid system could increase the GT-R's weight by up to 200 kilograms (441 pounds) and add at least $10,000, if not more, to the GT-R's already premium price. Rumors began swirling over a hybrid GT-R at least six years ago when the current R35 was in its fifth model year.

Another reason why Nissan isn't apt to completely rewire the current R35 is that it typically redesigns each GT-R's platform every 20 years, according to Tamura. When the R32 revived the Skyline GT-R nameplate in 1989, it retained the same basic underpinnings throughout the R33 and R34 series. The R35 was a clean-sheet design that, for the first time, officially busted the Japanese "gentleman's agreement" restricting engines to 276 horsepower (it made 480, even though many suspected it made much more).

Do the math – the R35 made its auto show debut in 2007, Tamura reminded us – and the next all-new GT-R, the R37, should debut no sooner than 2027. In the meantime, the R36 will arrive earlier, very likely as the conventional, gas-swilling supercar we still know and love.
 

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Mixed feelings on this. While the chassis has held up well, it certainly needs some updates to stay relevant if it is a "reskin".

They key point falling back to cost.
 

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https://www.motor1.com/news/346758/r36-nissan-gtr-hybrid/

R36 Nissan GT-R Probably Won't Be A Hybrid

Development costs, customer desires, and the longevity of the current R35 platform are likely to push a hybrid powertrain back several more years.

Despite a corporate push by Nissan to fit hybrid and battery-electric powertrains across its lineup, the next-gen Nissan GT-R almost certainly won't use them. As the GT-R's chief product specialist sees it, executives and customers don't want to make this supercar more expensive than it is now.

With the R36 model green-lit for production, Nissan is still undecided if it should invest in a brand-new chassis that could accommodate a gas-electric powertrain or update the existing R35 platform – no slouch after more than a decade on sale in the U.S. – and reskin the body. At the moment, according to GT-R legend Hiroshi Tamura, the latter is most likely.

"Do you really, really want a hybrid for the GT-R? Ninety-nine percent of our customers say, 'No, thanks,'" Tamura told Motor1.com at the New York Auto Show.

Adopting new technology that could amplify the GT-R's prodigious power and torque-vectoring performance isn't the biggest concern. It's cost. The 2019 GT-R starts at $101,685 for the Pure and finishes at $177,235 for a Nismo. Adding a gasoline-electric hybrid setup like the Acura NSX, Tamura said, could push the GT-R past $200,000 – and for Nissan, that's looking like a no-no.

"Mr. Customer, you have a choice," he said. "You cannot have both."

The next GT-R will be faster and stickier than before, because "you have to give the customer more." But the R36 can either stay within its current price range or approach the Lamborghini Huracan's window sticker. The Italdesign-built GT-R50, a 50-car run selling for more than $1 million apiece, is an experiment of how much the most loyal GT-R customers will pay. It's not indicative of a no-limit, anything-goes hypercar for the next generation.

Tamura estimates a hybrid system could increase the GT-R's weight by up to 200 kilograms (441 pounds) and add at least $10,000, if not more, to the GT-R's already premium price. Rumors began swirling over a hybrid GT-R at least six years ago when the current R35 was in its fifth model year.

Another reason why Nissan isn't apt to completely rewire the current R35 is that it typically redesigns each GT-R's platform every 20 years, according to Tamura. When the R32 revived the Skyline GT-R nameplate in 1989, it retained the same basic underpinnings throughout the R33 and R34 series. The R35 was a clean-sheet design that, for the first time, officially busted the Japanese "gentleman's agreement" restricting engines to 276 horsepower (it made 480, even though many suspected it made much more).

Do the math – the R35 made its auto show debut in 2007, Tamura reminded us – and the next all-new GT-R, the R37, should debut no sooner than 2027. In the meantime, the R36 will arrive earlier, very likely as the conventional, gas-swilling supercar we still know and love.
I know that Nissan are keen to keep us all interested in this but they have other problems at the moment and as the story develops the prospects of an R35 replacement looks increasingly bleak.
 

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Perhaps he***8217;s ahead of his time and knows all this battery b******s will blow over when people realise it***8217;s already a dead technology.
 

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europe idiots

https://www.motor1.com/news/346758/r36-nissan-gtr-hybrid/

R36 Nissan GT-R Probably Won't Be A Hybrid

Development costs, customer desires, and the longevity of the current R35 platform are likely to push a hybrid powertrain back several more years.

Despite a corporate push by Nissan to fit hybrid and battery-electric powertrains across its lineup, the next-gen Nissan GT-R almost certainly won't use them. As the GT-R's chief product specialist sees it, executives and customers don't want to make this supercar more expensive than it is now.

With the R36 model green-lit for production, Nissan is still undecided if it should invest in a brand-new chassis that could accommodate a gas-electric powertrain or update the existing R35 platform – no slouch after more than a decade on sale in the U.S. – and reskin the body. At the moment, according to GT-R legend Hiroshi Tamura, the latter is most likely.

"Do you really, really want a hybrid for the GT-R? Ninety-nine percent of our customers say, 'No, thanks,'" Tamura told Motor1.com at the New York Auto Show.

Adopting new technology that could amplify the GT-R's prodigious power and torque-vectoring performance isn't the biggest concern. It's cost. The 2019 GT-R starts at $101,685 for the Pure and finishes at $177,235 for a Nismo. Adding a gasoline-electric hybrid setup like the Acura NSX, Tamura said, could push the GT-R past $200,000 – and for Nissan, that's looking like a no-no.

"Mr. Customer, you have a choice," he said. "You cannot have both."

The next GT-R will be faster and stickier than before, because "you have to give the customer more." But the R36 can either stay within its current price range or approach the Lamborghini Huracan's window sticker. The Italdesign-built GT-R50, a 50-car run selling for more than $1 million apiece, is an experiment of how much the most loyal GT-R customers will pay. It's not indicative of a no-limit, anything-goes hypercar for the next generation.

Tamura estimates a hybrid system could increase the GT-R's weight by up to 200 kilograms (441 pounds) and add at least $10,000, if not more, to the GT-R's already premium price. Rumors began swirling over a hybrid GT-R at least six years ago when the current R35 was in its fifth model year.

Another reason why Nissan isn't apt to completely rewire the current R35 is that it typically redesigns each GT-R's platform every 20 years, according to Tamura. When the R32 revived the Skyline GT-R nameplate in 1989, it retained the same basic underpinnings throughout the R33 and R34 series. The R35 was a clean-sheet design that, for the first time, officially busted the Japanese "gentleman's agreement" restricting engines to 276 horsepower (it made 480, even though many suspected it made much more).

Do the math – the R35 made its auto show debut in 2007, Tamura reminded us – and the next all-new GT-R, the R37, should debut no sooner than 2027. In the meantime, the R36 will arrive earlier, very likely as the conventional, gas-swilling supercar we still know and love.
if these idiots get their way unless its electric it won't be on the road
 

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Perhaps he’s ahead of his time and knows all this battery b******s will blow over when people realise it’s already a dead technology.
I always laugh when I see those electric cars with the "zero emissions" or "no oil" stickers. Well then, how was the lithium mined from the ground? How was it transported? How was it made? What is the primary component all of the materials made out of? How is it the electricity harnessed mainly? Oh yeah, oil and coal. The owners and followers live in la-la land where they profusely believe that it's the future. Just a little trend, kind of how diesel got that huge trend decades ago. Going to be funny when the lithium supplies run out finally and how they'll react since those types of batteries ain't recyclable :chuckle:
 

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Yep, it***8217;s a government fraud tax.

People are such sheep.

Global warming is the biggest licence to print money for governments since they first struck oil, all in a farcical story of ***8220;helping the planet***8221;.

Pity the cavemen didn***8217;t have V8***8217;s when the ice age era ended - who did they blame back then?
 

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Definitely agree that people are lemmings nowadays. "Environmentally friendly." They got to get their heads out of their asses honestly.

Then you got cucks like Nico Rosberg (who thinks he German but is actually Finnish) or Leonardo DiCRAPio trying to shove it down our throats with bull shit events and fake made up data that was somehow "extracted" by scientists who are paid by politicians.

Feels kind of like we're living in a sort of matrix world honestly.
 

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Benny, you want to know what is even worse? This is coming from someone who is probably the youngest guy here. I'm younger than you by a decade and a couple extra years, if the 1984 symbolizes your birth year.

Trev, I was going through my Instagram feed and was watching fosgoodwood and saw them show a video of an electric Aston Martin! Jesus f*cking Christ! My favorite British car company getting ruined by this sort of crap. What is the point of an Aston Martin then? I want a V12, V10, V8 in my Aston. Not a battery with a motor. I don't care about the speed or the 0-60, I want a good race car pedigree vehicle that looks sexy, sounds sexy, and cruises/handles well. Also, I don't want to creep you out or something, but I was reading the comments on that post and I'm pretty sure I found you commenting something about how it's crap too. Small world.
 

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Benny, you want to know what is even worse? This is coming from someone who is probably the youngest guy here. I'm younger than you by a decade and a couple extra years, if the 1984 symbolizes your birth year.

Trev, I was going through my Instagram feed and was watching fosgoodwood and saw them show a video of an electric Aston Martin! Jesus f*cking Christ! My favorite British car company getting ruined by this sort of crap. What is the point of an Aston Martin then? I want a V12, V10, V8 in my Aston. Not a battery with a motor. I don't care about the speed or the 0-60, I want a good race car pedigree vehicle that looks sexy, sounds sexy, and cruises/handles well. Also, I don't want to creep you out or something, but I was reading the comments on that post and I'm pretty sure I found you commenting something about how it's crap too. Small world.
Dude, I’ve been so vocal about all this nonsense. Only today I hear more news BS about how the U.K. isn’t doing enough on climate change.

Like, seriously wtf?

If you think battery cars will save the world then we are really f****d.

The U.K. is such a small drop in the ocean, even if we were all brainwashed idiots into buying battery crap, it would not change a thing.
 

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Now they're making a big deal about the electric VW making the fastest time ever on that track. I'm just surprised that they didn't mention what happened after the run on how they had to replace the batteries immediately. But for some reason they don't let any F1 cars to do timed laps because they know the evs will be screwed.

The global warming thing doesn't make any sense at all. With the logic they present, our farts would cause all the ice caps to melt. Then you get naive women screaming at the top of their lungs "What about our kids, how will they survive?" Ah, your kids can go f*ck themselves, they'll still end up like spoiled rude brats who are glued onto their screens and never go outside.

They want to paint the streets of Los Angeles white to combat climate change. What a bunch of brainwashed schmucks.
 

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Not a big fan of electric / hybrid technology just more to go wrong and expensive to fix although it would be interesting if a future car made a leap to a carbon tub so lighter and purely a 2 seater
 

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Here***8217;s hoping they cater for Western European seat sizes and how about lower seats in fact just scrap the rear seats also
 
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