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People just believe in the hype and propaganda that certain people promote. :popcorn:
And you seem to be the biggest culprit of this :chuckle:

I would never buy an RB30 because it something that was never designed to be used hard.
Again....how hard do you want to use it? There are 1800hp RB30's and RB26's out there, both were never built to do that either, I guarantee my 630hp RB30 will be just as reliable (or more so) as any RB26's of similar power......What do you think goes wrong on an RB30?

Secondly it is a massive waste of time, money and messing around to get things working for little benefit vs the money spent.
Again, prob no more expensive than doing a Tomei 2.8......and the torque difference is a huge benefit. There will be very few 630hp at the wheels RB26's that have full 20psi boost by 3400rpm on pump gas!

If one day I feel the need for more torque I will buy a Tomei 2.8 stroker kit :thumbsup:
.....and you will still be 200cc behind in torque with an inferior rod angle ratio.:flame:
 

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I am done with this thread as it is getting rather boring now. :rolleyes:
Only logical thing you have said for days :bowdown1:

PMSL, I think this is funny as hell, could you imagine all of us sitting in a pub on the beers trying to "discuss" this, it would be the funniest s&*t ever.

Anyway, unlike some, I've actually been there, done that, got the T shirt to prove it, and I've tried just about every flavor of RB there is out there and I sure know what I'll be sticking with.

:wavey:
 

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I would never buy an RB30 because it something that was never designed to be used hard.
Yeah it's not like it was ever a production engine in a skyline... oh wait it was.
Yeah but it's not like it was ever a production turbo engine in a performance car... oh wait it was.

I always love when people are like yeah 2.6, 2.7, 2.8, 2.9 strokers are all awesome... yeah RB26 with a raiser plate to get 3L yeah awesome.
Factory designed 3L... nah they're shit mate.
 

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Everyone has completely missed what this thread says in the title.
OSG RB30 v rb30 !
It is now totally 30 v 26. How did that happen ?
Personally I don't understand the bias. I would use all. I would love 1 of Robs 30 builds, also would love a Tomei 28 ( this May be my next, but not till next year now ) To keep it on topic never really fancied the OS 30. Something about the plate on top of the block I don't like.
KM
 

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Some people are focusing on the Vs Rb30 Patrol/Holden Bitchfest part of the title ;)

Hilarious thread. With all the information available on the web its amazing how some of the anti-Nissan RB30 brigade don't have a clue about what they're talking about. Even if they haven't actually seen a Nissan RB30 in the flesh they could at least do some basic research on what it was actually used in and whats involved in actually converting to it.
My RB30 came out of a R31 Skyline according to its block code...sounds pretty Nissan OEM to me.

As mentioned by others if Nissan hadn't decided to go for the 2.6 (x1.7 multiplier) for the up to 4500cc class for racing then do you really think they wouldn't have developed an AWD RB30 block to compete on more level terms with cars like the Supra ? The RB30 block was in production before the RB26 block so it wouldn't have been difficult for Nissan to re-cast it as an AWD block. The low end torque would certainly have been handy in the portly old GT-R.

I bet if Mines had one in their R34 it would become socially acceptable overnight...

Cheers

Stu
 

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To understand the Australian RB30, you need to look at the whole history of the engine. It was the result of a tie up between Nissan Japan, and General Motors Holden in Australia. GMH needed a modern OHC EFI engine to replace the obsolete ancient pushrod carby engine they had been using.

But it had to compete directly with Fords 4.1 litre six cylinder engine. Australians (just like Americans) like big torquey engines. It was felt that the RB25DE just did not feel right to the average Aussie driver. While Japanese and European drivers are not afraid to use a few Rpm, out here a 2.5 litre engine just would not have the balls to compete in the market place with a 4.1 litre engine. That original Ford pushrod engine had a redline of only 4,100 Rpm and developed peak torque at only 1200 Rpm. But with an automatic transmission, it would easily pull around a heavy family car without noise or drama.

So the unique Aussie RB30E was born. Long stroke, big capacity, not particularly powerful, but it was exactly what the market here demanded to power taxis, very basic low end family sedans, and commercial vehicles. Nobody cared less about what it did over 5,000 Rpm becaue the breathing was so poor it could never get up there anyway. It was never designed to be a sports car engine.

The biggest weakness of that engine was the long flexy stroker crank, which is known to cause severe torsional vibration problems around about 6500 to 6800 Rpm. Those sorts of Rpm are just about impossible to reach with a standard RB30E anyway, so it was never a limitation.

Even the turbo version, the RB30ET was never a high reving engine. It made buckets of torque, and performed very well without needing to rev.

There are still thousands, maybe tens of thousands of older cars getting around with the original RB30E and RB30ET engines here in Australia. People are bolting on DOHC heads onto these old cars and getting fantastic performance. Realise though, that these old cars sell secondhand for about a thousand english pounds, and you get the general idea.

Young blokes in their teens with dreams and no money, are building up these RB30DET engines and fitting them to rust bucket cars and street racing them.

There is absolutely no comparison between a prime RB26DETT professionally built race engine, or a properly engineered Japanese stroker kit to what is going on out here in Australia right now.

There is absolutely nothing at all wrong with a budget RB30DET engine of maybe 400 to 500 Hp. That is quite enough power for most people, and it is very easy to do. Much more sensible than an expensively modified V8 which is about the only real alternative.

But 100Hp+ is just not realistic, the bare original block is about the only thing that you could possibly use. But I suppose that would still mean it is an RB30, right?
There you go lol the bit about taxis lol I think the part about young blokes in there teens is a dig at combat32 lol
 

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Rod ratio effects volumetric efficiency. The RB30 has a rod ratio of 1.79, the OSG30 has a rod ratio of 1.61. The optimum is reckoned to be 1.75. Making the Nissan RB30 the best on that area.

Rod ratio effects volumetric efficiency due to a longer dwell at top dead center.
The difference in rod stroke amounts to such a little difference it is not even worthy of posting any information on it, don't mislead people.

Piston Motion: The Obvious and not-so-Obvious, by EPI, Inc.

The RB30 is a 'bigger pump' and will produce more exhaust gases, it is so simple.

The RB26 is a complete package designed for a specific purpose and was going to be a 2.4L initially not a 2.6L or 3.0L. Designed to work in a higher rev range at longer periods of time, hence, oil squirters, etc. The RB30 isn't, but that is not to say it will not be equally or more successful as a competition engine.

I really don't think people understand the specific differences and characteristics of the two engines enough to be getting to excited and opinionated.
 
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