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This is a step-by-step instruction for changing the pads on the standard rear Brembo brakes on an R33 GTR. I assume the instructions will be identical for an R34 GTR. They should also be very similar for any brake setup on any car, Skyline or otherwise. Sorry, some of the pictures aren't that great.

Tools:
Flathead screw driver
Pliers
18mm box wrench
Rubber mallet
2 x C-clamp
Brake lube
Rear brake pads

1. Use a hydraulic lift, or jack up the rear of the vehicle and use jack stands, remove the wheels.

2. On the leading edge of the brake caliper assembly are two retaining pins and a spring clip. The two retaining pins are held in place by cotter pins. Use a flat head screwdriver to remove the cotter pins. All of mine came off easily.



3. Use a set of pliers to pull the retaining pins out of the caliper assembly. The spring clip will fall/shoot out. Gather up all the pieces, clean them up, set them aside.



4. Next remove the old brake pads and shims. I wasn’t able to work them free with the pliers, so I used the flathead screw driver to lever them out. Clean up the shim plates and set them aside.

5. In order to replace the brake pads, you will need to compress the pistons. This will require you to remove the caliper assembly from the hub. It is held on by two 18mm bolts on the back side of the caliper assembly. The lower bolt is somewhat blocked by the parking brake cable, and the upper bolt is somewhat blocked by one of the suspension assemblies (see pics). I couldn’t get a socket and ratchet in there, so I used a box wrench. You will probably need the rubber mallet to break the bolts free.



6. After removing the two bolts, pull the caliper assembly away from the rotor, and set it on top of the rotor/suspension. DO NOT let the caliper hang freely from the brake line.

7. Take the top off the brake fluid reservoir in the engine bay. This helps allow fluid to flow back into the reservoir as you compress the pistons. You will need two C-clamps to compress the pistons. They must both be compressed at the same time. Otherwise, compressing one causes the other to pop back out. You may want to put something between the C-clamp and the outside of the caliper, to avoid damaging the finish on your pretty brakes. You can see the damage on my brake caliper from a previous owner's buffoonery.

8. After compressing the pistons, put the caliper back on the hub and loosely attach it with the two bolts. This will give you a little extra wiggle room as you put in the new pads.

9. Stack up the new pads and the shims, lubing everything with copper grease or your brake lube or preference. Pay particular attention to the metal shim. Your brakes squeal when the metal pistons vibrate against the metal shims under light braking loads. A good film of lubricant will help avoid or delay the squealing.

10. After the pads and shims are back in the caliper assembly, tighten down the two bolts. (I don’t know the torque values, so if someone can provide them, I will edit the post)

11. Slide one retaining pin back into the caliper assembly, hook the spring clip under the first pin, then hold it down while sliding the second retaining pin in. Pay attention to the holes for the cotter pins, as you won’t be able to see them once the retaining pins are inserted.

This concludes the changing of the brake pads. When you get back in the car, pump the brakes a few times to seat the pistons again. Also, be careful on your first few braking attempts as your pads aren’t making full contact with the rotors yet.

For reference, I replaced the pads that were on the car with Porterfield R4-S compound (part #:AP 961). The R4-S compound doesn’t dust too badly, but still works well. I use the R4 compound in the front for trackdays. Porterfield are a US company that really doesn’t know Skyline, so I ordered the Brembo pads for the 350Z. They fit perfectly. I know EBC shows the 350Z and Skyline Brembos as different part numbers, but they are the exact same pads.

11. BLEEDING: There are two valves on each Brembo brake assembly. One on the inside and one on the outside. The generally accepted practice is to start as far from the brake reservoir as possible and move in – left rear, right rear, left front, right front. Outside valve first, then inside valve. I installed a set of these: Speed Bleeder Bleeding Brakes Bleeding Motorcycle Brakes Automotive Bleeder Screw Brake Bleeder. It allows you to easily bleed the brakes by yourself. The part number is: SB1010-S. I ordered the stainless steel variants.
 

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Nce post..

THanks for taking the time to do that:bowdown1:

I'm about to change mine so this will come in handy:smokin:
 

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Used this from the SOC & it's been great help, managed to do my pads without any pbm :)
 

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Great post, we need more of these guides! I'll try and do one when I change my rear track rods.

For reference, I found I didn't need to remove the calipers to push the pistons back. I used a pair of water pump pliers to gently ease them back, a bit at a time on alternate sides until they're both fully back. You need to go carefully to avoid marking the caliper or piston face.
 
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