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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is lighter always better?
I.e. on a GTS-T I 'feel' that leaving the spare wheel, tool-kit, rear seats, and parcel shelf in is better due to better weight distribution, but am I fooling myself, would/is lighter ALWAYS better on a track?
Or where, say 70/30 of 1400kg front rear is 'ok' but would 80/20 of 1200kg be worse? - figures plucked from thin air, but I hope you get where I'm going with this.
What are your thoughts, or morte importantly your experiences with this?
Thanks,
Andrew.
 

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It will be pretty bad to have a 80/20 car... You will have to put weight in the front to make it that bad I would say.

I would say on most car... up to a certain extreme point, lighter will always be better.
It will always be easier to change the director of a lighter mass, therefore lighter will always be better if all else remains equal (or nearly equal).
 

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An ideal weight distribution would be 51/49, I don't really know what the weight distribution is in Skyline GTR or GTS's. But reducing the weight does give you better acceleration and braking as well as improve the handling due to less mass. All time attack series cars are stripped naked for weight loss and the timing does improve in a circuit. Downforce and good aerodynamics are other key factors too.
 

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Lighter is always better, however the weight of the car is just the tip of the iceberg. Weight distribution is very important, and its logical to say that a lighter car with good weight distribution is going to perform better than a heavier car that also has good weight distribution.

There is way more to concider when setting up the car. Unsprung weight needs to be kept to a minimum. Spring rates, shock compression and rebound settings need to be set. Geometry needs to be set up, sways bars have to be the correct weight. The list goes on.

Its a bit of a science to get it right but the results are well worth it. A car with all the power in the world is useless if it cant get the power down.
 

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Is lighter always better?
I.e. on a GTS-T I 'feel' that leaving the spare wheel, tool-kit, rear seats, and parcel shelf in is better due to better weight distribution, but am I fooling myself, would/is lighter ALWAYS better on a track?
Or where, say 70/30 of 1400kg front rear is 'ok' but would 80/20 of 1200kg be worse? - figures plucked from thin air, but I hope you get where I'm going with this.
What are your thoughts, or morte importantly your experiences with this?
Thanks,
Andrew.
Lighter is better in that you'll generally have improved accelleration, better handling, better braking and improved economy but weight distribution also helps with traction as well as handling.

With a RWD car like your GTS-T you'll get better drive out of corners with more weight over the back wheels so ideally you would want to move weight from the front half of the car to the rear of the car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lighter is better in that you'll generally have improved accelleration, better handling, better braking and improved economy but weight distribution also helps with traction as well as handling.

With a RWD car like your GTS-T you'll get better drive out of corners with more weight over the back wheels so ideally you would want to move weight from the front half of the car to the rear of the car.
I agree, but when you've done everything to get the front as light as possible, and the weight bias is still very much (200kg's) forward, would you still remove the spare etc. for lightness from the rear, or leave it (as I have so far) for better traction/balance, that is the real question?
 

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I agree, but when you've done everything to get the front as light as possible, and the weight bias is still very much (200kg's) forward, would you still remove the spare etc. for lightness from the rear, or leave it (as I have so far) for better traction/balance, that is the real question?
I've been driving rwd cars for the last 20 years so personally I would leave the weight in the back unless its a dedicated track car. I've come into the Skyline world from 200SX's and when tuned to the same power levels I personally prefer to drive the earlier RS13 over the later S14 200SX because allthough they weigh roughly the same I find the RS13 to be more forgiving to drive with better traction and better balance under braking. The glass tailgate and rear structure places more weight over the rear of the car on the RS13 200SX so the f/r weight split is more favourable.

If you decided to make your car a dedicated track car then you'll probably lose 25-30kgs from the rear of the car with the stuff that you're talking about removing but you'd be adding a cage - the heaviest part of which is in the rear so the f/r weight split would be around the same as before.

I have actually removed the rear seats from the back of my R32 because I fitted a rollcage and harnesses for trackdays. The rear seats on the 32 don't weigh a lot (under 10 kgs I would questimate) and I'll also be re-locating the battery into the boot and the screenwash tank (I'll be running water injection again) and trying to remove any superfluous weight from under the bonnet without compromising it too much as a road car. With the lightweight front seats/roll cage and the battery and tank in the rear the f/r split should be more favourable and I'm not intending to strip the rear of the car anymore. :)
 
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